Tag Archives: cardiovascular health

Personal Training: 8 Steps to Break the Cycle of Self-Sabotage

I would love to say that every client we work with reaches their health and fitness goals and leaves our studio happier and healthier than they could have ever imagined. After all, that’s what we – as the trainers and instructors – want for them, and what we work tirelessly, both in sessions and outside of sessions, to help them achieve. We have developed a unique and foolproof plan to help anyone reach their goals, and we have proven results from lots of clients who have, indeed, reached and even exceeded their goals with us. But the truth is, many clients that we work with quit before they reach their health and fitness goals. Why? Not because they are incapable – because they are all capable. But because they sabotage themselves, in one way or another, and prevent themselves from getting to where they want to be, and from allowing us to help. Some clients even begin the self-sabotage pattern before they begin training. Here we’ll discuss how to know if you’re self-sabotaging, why self-sabotaging happens, and how you can break the cycle in order to make real progress with your goals, whatever they may be.

Most people have sabotaged themselves at some point in their life, whether it was procrastinating on that report in school, missing an important event at work, or eating Ben and Jerry’s after a commitment to go sugar free. We sabotage ourselves when things are hard, or uncomfortable, and even sometimes when things are good. It doesn’t seem to make sense, and we often aren’t even aware that that’s what we’re doing.

It doesn’t make you a failure if you do this, it makes you human. The key is, though, to bring awareness to these patterns and to work toward change.

How to Know if You’re Self-Sabotaging

Personal Training is, well, personal. We get to know our clients really well, and because we’re more objective, we’re often able to see things – patterns – that the client may not see themselves. Here are some ways that we suspect that we’re dealing with self-sabotage:

  • A client with significant health issues signs up for a definitive number of sessions and immediately talks about quitting once those sessions are over.
  • A client who pronounces within 5 minutes of meeting is that they have a pattern of self-sabotage, yet often have not taken any steps to overcome this.
  • A client that misses sessions with various excuses
  • A client that refuses to try parts of our plan; or a client who agrees to our plan but consistently makes same mistakes without concrete attempt to overcome
  • A client that says something to the effect of “I really want to _______, but I will not do ______”. For example “I want to lose weight but I refuse to give up bread” or “I want to lower my blood pressure but I don’t have time to take deep breaths every day”.
  • A client who makes progress, but then quits before reaching his/her goals.

Do any of these things sound familiar? Do you see yourself doing or thinking this way? Self-sabotaging comes from negative self statements and fear. The negative self statements are often things that we tell ourselves subconsciously, that sabotage our efforts. For example “I’m too fat to do that”, “I won’t succeed”, “I’m not worth it”. These statements translate into fear of doing things that are hard. Fear of overcoming all the things that hold us back. Fear of allowing ourselves to do good things for ourselves because it might not last. These statements and feelings can translate into “I’ll never get to my goal so I might as well enjoy this pizza and ice cream” or “I can’t afford personal training anymore” or ” This plan isn’t for me”.

How to Break the Cycle

So if you see this pattern in yourself, or suspect that you may have a tendency to self-sabotage, you’re probably now wondering what you can do about it. We’ll, actually wanting to do something about it is the first step! Here are 8 Steps to Break the Cycle of Self-Sabotage, to move forward with your goals, and to be your best self:

  1. Acknowledge what you’re doing
  2. Dig deep and find that inner voice of negativity. What is it saying? Is there a theme?
  3. Become aware of the feelings and thoughts that arise when you become uncomfortable. The diet gets too hard, the workouts are challenging, your trainer asks questions that make you reflect on negativity from your past: what do you see yourself doing and hear yourself saying in these moments?
  4. Now that you have brought awareness to the negative voices and your behavior patterns, you must work to actively and consciously change these things.
  5. Set small goals – setting goals too big or unrealistic can lead to failure and further negativity toward yourself.
  6. Practice non-judgment and non-harming toward yourself. When you hear the negative voices creeping in, acknowledge them, without judgment, and consciously change them to positive or kind voices. By consciously changing the internal chatter, the subconscious will soon follow.
  7. Enjoy and celebrate in your accomplishments, no matter how small.
  8. Don’t give up. When you feel like giving up, go back to Step 1.

If you find that self-sabotage is something you struggle with, or if you struggle to reach health and fitness goals but aren’t sure why, come see us, we can help! Contact us to schedule your free private consult in-studio or virtually!

Illness or Injury: Why It’s Important to Keep Moving

Illness and injury can put a damper on a health and fitness routine, and can sometimes result in complete loss of motivation. Aside from not feeling well, being sick or injured can be frustrating to say the least, especially if you’re someone who works hard to reach certain goals. But illness and injury are not necessarily good excuses to miss your appointment with your trainer, your daily visit to the gym, or your home yoga practice. In fact, if you stop moving you can actually do more harm than good to your body, and as a result, your mind too.

Benefits of Exercising When Sick or Injured

There are benefits to keeping up with some form of a workout routine when suffering a minor illness or injury.

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  • Sticking to a routine. Maintaining a health routine leads to better success in reaching your goals in the long run. You will be more likely to continue your health and fitness routine once you recover, and will feel less intimidated by the thought of returning. Psychologically and physically, maintaining your routine and schedule is imperative to reaching your health and fitness goals.
  • Post-surgery, exercise can help you heal faster. Obviously this depends on the type of surgery, and workouts will need to be modified, but by keeping the body moving you are increasing your chances of a speedy and healthy recovery.
  • Help relieve pain. While joint pain and inflammatory injuries make you feel like you don’t want to move, ever, exercising can actually improve symptoms and discomfort.
  • Boosts energy. Being sick or injured can deplete your energy levels, causing you to want to remain sedentary, which then makes you more tired…it’s a vicious cycle. Movement can help boost your energy and therefore your ability to recover faster.

When Should You NOT or When Should You STOP?

Obviously if you’re severely sick or injured exercise may not be an option. Additionally, you never want to push your body to the point that your illness or injury is made worse. According to an article by Dr. Mercola, fever, widespread body aches, and vomiting are all good reasons to take it easy. However, if you have a head cold or sinus infection, feel free to keep moving. Likewise, you can speed the healing of minor injuries through movements and stretches, when done the right way. But always listen to your body. High intensity may not be the most effective or beneficial type of exercise when sick or injured, for example. Yoga or lightweight movements may be a better choice. Here are some examples of modified exercises or movements that you can do when sick or injured, being mindful of your body and what your body is going through.

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  • Lightweight or bodyweight exercises, such as thrusters, air squats, or even push-ups can help the body recover, increase energy, and keep fit even during illness and injury. Modify the amount of weight you use and the number of repetitions to avoid fatigue or pain.
  • Different kinds of movements. Using different areas of the body than the areas that are injured is one way to keep moving when injured, without re-traumatizing the body.
  • Plank or modified plank is a safe movement for many illnesses or injuries. Depending on how you’re feeling you can get creative with it, or simply hold it for increasing amounts of time.
  • Yoga. Meditation is great anytime, no matter the illness and no matter the injury. It’s a great way to stay focused, to reduce stress, and to help the body heal through a positive mind and body. Yoga poses can also be extremely beneficial, as some poses are even designed to help certain areas of the body heal from both sickness and injury. Yoga is a wonderful way to keep the body moving, to relieve pain and stress, and to maintain strength and flexibility while recovering.

If you are fortunate enough to have a well-trained, knowledgeable personal trainer or yoga instructor, you are in good hands! Continue your regular routine with them, and they will be able to modify your sessions around the needs of your body. We often encourage clients to come in, even if just for a meditation practice, in order to keep their routine, their motivation, and to uplift their mood during illness or injury. When clients are unable to come in we offer virtual sessions via Skype.

Interested in a free consult to learn about our personal training or private yoga sessions? Contact us to try our online private training or health transformation consulting services, or if local to Philadelphia, a class or private session!

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This website may, from time to time, endorse various products and/or services that we believe will benefit you in your quest for improving your life and health. It may be true that this website and its owner will receive compensation for these endorsements should you choose to purchase said products or services. In fact, in such cases, you should assume that we are an affiliate and will be compensated. Having said that, this website and its owner will only endorse products and/or services in which we strongly believe, or which we have used ourselves. By using this website, you hereby consent to the disclaimer and agree to all terms, policies, and conditions.

10 Non-Food Ways That We Use Coconut Oil in Our House

Coconut oil in our house is one of those items that we would have a hard time living without. We try to be pretty minimal when it comes to shopping, and products that are both healthy and multi-purpose are wins. There are a million and one uses for coconut oil, ranging from using it as a cleaner, to using it in your favorite brownie recipe. It’s well-known and revered in both the primal/paleo and the non-paleo world, as one of the healthiest foods on the planet, and one of the most versatile products to own.

Benefits of Coconut Oil

The benefits of coconut oil have been proven in over a thousand research studies, and the list is endless. Here are a few commonly known benefits of this amazing fruit:

  • high in saturated fat, making it heart healthy
  • can heal urinary infections
  • high in antioxidants
  • can reduce inflammation
  • anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral
  • improves gut health
  • helps balance hormones
  • improves hair and skin conditions
  • prevents tooth decay and other dental problems
  • treats candida and yeast infections

10 Non-Food Ways That We Use Coconut Oil in Our House

In order to gain benefit from coconut oil, you can eat it as part of your regular diet. Grease your pans with it, cook your eggs in it, use it in baking recipes, melt it over your favorite veggies, etc. But don’t stop there! Coconut oil can be used in a myriad of ways that are non-food related! *Just as a note, I believe that anything that goes on your body should be safe enough to go in your body. After all, your skin is your largest organ, and it absorbs anything that you put on it – if you wouldn’t eat certain chemicals and toxins, why would you put them on your skin? Here are 10 Non-Food Ways That We Use Coconut Oil in Our House:

  1. Skincare. We use coconut oil in our homemade body butters, lip balms, lotion bars, deodorants, and sunscreen. It has a natural SPF of 4, is an excellent moisturizer, and can heal skin conditions. Additionally, in a pinch we use plain coconut oil on our dry skin or lips – doesn’t get much easier than that!
  2. Haircare. We use coconut oil in our homemade hair pomades and conditioners. To condition hair, simple rub between your hands until soft, then rub on ends of hair and into scalp. Leave on for 1 hour or even overnight, then rinse. *Be careful not to use coconut oil in the shower or sink too frequently as we have found that it clogs the drain when used regularly!
  3. Detox Bath. We love detox baths, and while we don’t take them as often as we’d like, we definitely feel the benefits when we do. It’s great for kids too, and seems to instantly relax them. Here’s a simple recipe to try:
    – 1/2c Epsom salts or magnesium flakes,
    – 1/4c coconut oil
    – 2-3 drops of essential oils (such as lavender or eucalyptus)
    – Hot bath
  4. Dental Care. We oil pull. Oil pulling is an ancient Ayurvedic technique, used to draw out toxins from the mouth and body, and create a sort of anti-septic environment. It is said to prevent tooth decay, kill bad breath, and whiten teeth, among other oral hygiene benefits. How to do it: Swish about a tablespoon on coconut oil around in your mouth for about 20 minutes. Spit into trash can. Do this daily for noticeable benefit.
  5. Cleaning. We even use coconut oil for cleaning purposes! It cleans crayon and other marks off of walls, a trick that I was very grateful to learn. We also use it to clean marks off of furniture!
  6. Petfood/Health. Did you know that coconut oil is also beneficial for pets? Makes sense, since it’s
    so beneficial for us, right? We give our cats food that contains coconut oil daily, and have noticed a huge difference in their digestion and fur since starting it.
  7. Carrier Oil for Use with Essential Oils. Coconut oil is one of our favorite carrier oils when using essential oils. We mix it with peppermint eo to help with headaches, eucalyptus eo for a chest rub when sick, tea tree eo when needing a powerful antibacterial (think warts or fungus), wintergreen eo for sore muscles, and many more.
  8. Candles. I’ve started making my own homemade candles from beeswax and coconut oil. It’s so easy, and a greta way to avoid the chemicals and toxins that many candles consist of. I can add my favorite essential oils for an amazing scent too!
  9. Cough Suppressant. We make our own cough drops and cough medicine using combinations of coconut oil, ginger, cinnamon, and honey, all immune-boosting superpowers.
  10. Itches. We sometimes use coconut oil plain, or more often blended with essential oils, for relieving the sting or itches of bug bites or rashes.

As you can see, coconut oil really is a go-to for us; so much so that our kids even request it when they have a minor ailment! Hopefully this list will inspire you, if you’re not already a coconut-oil fanatic! What are your favorite uses for coconut oil?

 

 

 

 

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This website may, from time to time, endorse various products and/or services that we believe will benefit you in your quest for improving your life and health. It may be true that this website and its owner will receive compensation for these endorsements should you choose to purchase said products or services. In fact, in such cases, you should assume that we are an affiliate and will be compensated. Having said that, this website and its owner will only endorse products and/or services in which we strongly believe, or which we have used ourselves. By using this website, you hereby consent to the disclaimer and agree to all terms, policies, and conditions.

Keeping the “Fun” in Functional Fitness

Keeping the “Fun” in Functional Fitness

If you’ve ever tried a functional fitness class, you’ve probably noticed that it is unlike most fitness classes that you’ve done before. I remember when I first tried a Crossfit class years ago and was immediately struck by two things: 1) How unique and weirdly fun the class was, and 2) How HARD this unique and weirdly fun class was. Like many, I was hooked. I continued taking classes, learning about the style as much as I could, and went on to become a Crossfit Level 2 certified trainer. When opening Water and Rock Studio, we made functional fitness one of the fundamental components of our studio. Why? Because we believe that whole body, multi-joint functional movements are integral to overall health and performance. Read this post to learn more about the benefits of multi-joint movements. We’ve seen the results, we’ve experienced the results, and we want to inspire others to join in the fun!
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The Water and Rock Studio Approach

Our philosophy for functional fitness is as unique as the movements we use. We’ve taken what we have learned – and continue learning – and have put our spin on it. We believe that working out should be

Accessible. First and foremost, we believe in making fitness accessible to everyone: every age and every fitness level.
Empowering. We provide you with the tools to make this an ongoing part of your lifestyle, not just a once a week trip to the gym, and not something that you need to dread. Functional fitness teaches us that we don’t need a lot of equipment, a large gym, or a lot of time to get in shape, reach our goals, and have fun doing it!
Varied. We use varied movements that work the whole body, rather than isolated muscle groups. Each class is different, and you will rarely do the same workout twice!
Integrative. We provide an integrative approach to all of our private sessions and classes. Functional fitness is no different. It’s not unusual for us to throw in striking or yoga postures throughout the workout, or to end with meditation.
Intense. Research shows that short, intense workouts can be more beneficial than an hour on the treadmill or elliptical. We encourage intensity, while also honoring each student’s personal level and threshold. We want you to work hard, to gain maximum health benefit, and within our safe and supportive environment.
Innovative. We strive to keep our functional fitness sessions and classes new, fresh, and outside the box (no pun intended, crossfitters). You never know when our classes may require flipping tires on the sidewalk, egg races, reverse burpees, or running to the nearest playground to, well, play!
Fun. This is key. As I said, this was one of the things that initially drew me to Crossfit, and one of the tenets of this style that I did not want to lose sight of. We have fun creating the classes, and we want to make sure our students have fun too. That’s not to say they lack intensity or integrity, rest assured.

Intrigued? Get rid of that repetitive elliptical, step outside of your treadmill box, and come see for yourself what it’s all about! Contact us  to try our online functional fitness services, or if local to Philadelphia, a class or private session.

14 Health Benefits of Magnesium and How to Make Sure You’re Getting Enough

14 Health Benefits of Magnesium and How to Make Sure You’re Getting Enough

Magnesium is an essential mineral for our bodies, with endless benefits, yet it’s not something that we hear a lot about in the mainstream medical realm. When we bring this up to our clients, for example, we often get blank looks, or sometimes a vague sign of recognition. Despite the lack of awareness for this mineral, an estimated 80% of Americans are actually deficient in magnesium, and the symptoms can range from mild to severe. We hope that after you read this post you will be armed with more knowledge and awareness about the importance of healthy magnesium levels, what to look for if you think you may be magnesium-deficient, and how to use diet and supplementation to compensate for any deficiency.

Signs of Magnesium Deficiency

Symptomology is the primary indicator of a magnesium deficiency. There is no lab test that can accurately and consistently diagnose a person as deficient in magnesium. While there are blood and urine tests that provide estimates of magnesium levels, most doctors Will likely look at the presenting symptoms as the primary indicators. So what symptoms should you be looking for? A magnesium deficiency, especially one that has been ongoing, can cause a number of symptoms. Some of the most common ones are:

  • Muscle weakness and cramps
  • Seizures
  • Hypertension and abnormal heart rhythms
  • Mood swings and behavioral disorders
  • Restless leg syndrome
  • Other nutrient deficiencies
  • Headache/migraines
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Significant loss of appetite

14 Health Benefits of Magnesium

Numerous studies have evaluated the benefits of magnesium, with staggering results. Here are 14 health benefits of magnesium:

  1. Relieves muscle aches, cramping, and spasms
  2. Aids digestion and relieves constipation
  3. Helps with sleep by quieting the mind and relaxing muscles
  4. Calms nerves
  5. Increases energy
  6. Helps prevent hypertension and promote heart health
  7. Helps relieve symptoms of PMS
  8. Helps prevent migraines
  9. Helps relieve pain of fibromyalgia
  10. Promotes healthy blood pressure levels
  11. Can boost exercise performance
  12. Helps regulate mood and reduce symptoms of depression
  13. Promotes bone health
  14. Strengthens tooth enamel

How to Make Sure You’re Getting Enough

Magnesium-Rich Foods. If you suspect that you may be deficient in magnesium, it is always a good idea to evaluate your diet. Add in as many whole, organic, and varied foods as possible. Remember that plant foods are only as healthy as the soil they were grown in. Organic vegetables, for example, tend to have higher levels of magnesium than non-organic. Some foods naturally rich in magnesium include:

  • Spinach
  • Chard
  • Avocado
  • Almonds
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Banana
  • Figs
  • Dark chocolate
  • Salmon

Magnesium Supplements. Depending on your symptoms, it may be a good idea to use magnesium supplements. There are lots of different types of magnesium supplements, with the citrate, chelate, and chloride forms believed to have higher absorption rates. We use Davinci Labs Tri-Mag 300, which provides three chelates forms of magnesium. As with any supplementation, its important that you additionally adhere to a diet of varied, whole and organic foods. The paleo diet provides healthy levels of magnesium, as well as an optimal calcium to magnesium ratio.

Contact us at Water and Rock Studio for a free online or in-studio health consult today!


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This website may, from time to time, endorse various products and/or services that we believe will benefit you in your quest for improving your life and health. It may be true that this website and its owner will receive compensation for these endorsements should you choose to purchase said products or services. In fact, in such cases, you should assume that we are an affiliate and will be compensated. Having said that, this website and its owner will only endorse products and/or services in which we strongly believe, or which we have used ourselves. By using this website, you hereby consent to the disclaimer and agree to all terms, policies, and conditions.

The Misunderstood Core

The Misunderstood Core

How many times have you heard a fitness or yoga instructor point to his or her abdominals and say “core”? As in “strengthen your core”, “activate your core”, or “this works your core”. To many clients that we see, “core” is synonymous with “abs”, which is not entirely accurate. The core, it seems, is grossly misunderstood.

What is the “core”?

The core is a group of muscles that includes, but is not limited to, the abdominals. The muscles of the core involve back, side and front muscles of the body, extending from the sternum all the way down through the gluten and hamstrings. The job of the core is to stabilize and support the spine. My guess is that the core was aptly named because it is at the core of every movement our body makes, and without it most physical movement would be challenging if not impossible.
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What types of exercises strengthen the core?

Having a strong core is imperative to a healthy fitness routine. Kettle bell swings require a great deal of core strength to stabilize the movement and support the spine effectively. When throwing a punch from fight stance, the core is working to prevent you from overtwisting or turning, and helps drive and power the strike. In yoga, the core muscles are engaged and working during every asana to assist with balance and stability, and to help keep other parts of the body stable as well.

Just as the core is misunderstood, so are core exercises. Isolation exercises targeting the abdominals such as crunches are good, but they are just that: isolated. Doing isolated movements only can actually lead to impaired performance outside of a gym. In order to improve performance our bodies must be viewed as more holistic, both in mind-body connection and in terms of muscular strength. Maximum performance comes from muscles learning to work together.

We recommend whole body, multi-joint exercises, done at a relatively high intensity, for maximum health benefit and core strength-building. These can be done with or without weights, and can be done anywhere, no gym needed! Some fundamental exercises to try are:

  • Squats
  • Push-ups
  • Burpees
  • Thrusters
  • Sumo Deadlift Highpull
  • Kettle Bell Swings
  • Planks/Side Planks

Here Japheth demonstrates three fundamental exercises that help strengthen and engage the core. You can try these on your own at home:

Adding weighted movements can also help work the core muscles tremendously. Here is Japheth demonstrating a Sumo Deadlift High pull:

Working with a certified personal trainer can be a great way to get started on building and maintaining core strength, and learning more about how your core works. Contact us at Water and Rock Studio if you’d like to schedule a free virtual or in-studio consult!

 

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This website may, from time to time, endorse various products and/or services that we believe will benefit you in your quest for improving your life and health. It may be true that this website and its owner will receive compensation for these endorsements should you choose to purchase said products or services. In fact, in such cases, you should assume that we are an affiliate and will be compensated. Having said that, this website and its owner will only endorse products and/or services in which we strongly believe, or which we have used ourselves. By using this website, you hereby consent to the disclaimer and agree to all terms, policies, and conditions.

How to Make Healthy Homemade Sunbutter (nut-free, sugar-free)

 

How to Make Healthy Homemade Sunbutter (nut-free, sugar-free)

I love nut butters, and with my paleo lifestyle, nuts were my not-so-guilty pleasure for a long time. Almonds, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, macadamia nuts, no nut was safe! I started making my own nut butters a couple of years ago, when I became more aware of what my habit was costing me, and also when I became more conscious of all of the unnecessary and often unhealthy ingredients that are added to most store-bought versions…oils, sugar, words I didn’t recognize. Making your own nut butter is not only super-easy, but also cost-efficient, especially when you buy your nuts in bulk. All you need is a food processor and a jar to store it in!

Now, onto sunbutter. I discovered sunbutter when I started realizing that my beloved nuts were actually causing me some digestive distress. They made me bloated and uncomfortable. For many people they can also be a barrier to weight loss. Like many, I found that seeds do not have the same effect on my body, and I find them to be just as delicious. I often sprinkle them over salads, use them as a substitute for nut butters when baking, and even eat sunbutter drenched in honey for a treat sometimes. This homemade sunbutter is not only healthy, but with the added sweetness of the coconut sugar (sunbutter alone can be a little bitter), it is yummy enough for your whole family to enjoy!

Benefits of Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are beneficial to your health for several reasons. They are a great source of vitamin E, magnesium, and selenium. Because of these properties, these delicious seeds can help promote cardiovascular health, detoxification, healthy cholesterol levels, and a healthy mood. They also, of course, make a healthy and delicious snack, and even dessert!

How to Make Healthy Homemade Sunbutter
4c. Shelled sunflower seeds
1/3c coconut sugar
1/2 tsp Himalayan sea salt

Preheat oven to 350. Spread sunflower seeds in thin layer on parchment paper lined, rimmed baking sheet (you may need 2 if you’re sheets are smaller like mine). Toast them in the oven until they are lightly golden, about 20 minutes. Be sure to stir them every few minutes to keep them from burning. **Toasting the seeds first makes it easier for them to release their natural oils, thus eliminating the need for added oil!

Once they are toasted, pour them into your food processor and start processing. This will take several minutes, so just turn it on, go do a load of laundry and come back. Don’t stare at the sunbutter. I do that, and it doesn’t go any faster. If you are staring at it, you’ll notice that the sunflower seeds first turn into a ground meal-like substance, and then a few minutes later will turn into more of a sticky ball, as the oils begin releasing. Don’t stop here! Keep going for a few more minutes and the butter will reach a creamy consistency. At this point you can add the coconut sugar and salt and continue to process to combine. It will look like this

Spoon into a jar of your choice and try not to eat it all at once. Or eat it all, we’ve all been there.

I hope you try this healthy homemade sunbutter recipe, and enjoy it as much as I do! What other nut butters have you made?

 

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This website may, from time to time, endorse various products and/or services that we believe will benefit you in your quest for improving your life and health. It may be true that this website and its owner will receive compensation for these endorsements should you choose to purchase said products or services. In fact, in such cases, you should assume that we are an affiliate and will be compensated. Having said that, this website and its owner will only endorse products and/or services in which we strongly believe, or which we have used ourselves. By using this website, you hereby consent to the disclaimer and agree to all terms, policies, and conditions.